Put on my shoe and you'll know, it hurts



She didn’t want to be herself. She didn’t like cowering from dominating and authoritative persons, or losing an argument with a respectable person too soon. Neither could she cope with the repeated failures in her attempts to confront her mother, nor could she win over all her friends. She daren’t talk about her dreams to her father for being laughed at the illogicality of it all. She didn’t ever speak of her precious wishes and ambitions to anyone, for it may be just trampled over by them. She wasn’t sure if anyone would care enough to tread on with a light feet. She needed assurances, confirmations, consolations, optimisms, and a boost to her self esteem on a daily basis.



She wanted to be a different person. She wanted to be a child once again, or a baby who has no care in the world. Being an adult is difficult, it’s very tough. She yearned to relive life, being a new herself and starting over once again, when she wouldn’t have to think her step twice; wouldn’t have to shy away from anyone overpowering; wouldn’t have to deal with superiorities and inferiorities, and just would bask in the love and cares bestowed upon her. 

This is a piece of fiction written for The Write Tribe's Wednesday Promt.

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Queeristan by Parmesh Sahani

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  Queeristan (Amazon Link) Thanks to Audible Free Trial I listened to this amazing non-fiction on LGBTQ inclusion in Indian workplaces. Author Parmesh Sahani identifies as gay Indian, working closely with Godrej higher management and employees for years to create an inclusive workplace, both legally and in spirit. This book is a result of those years of experience, research, collaboration with individuals from difference spectrum of the society and organizations who has successfully transitioned into a queer friendly one.   Indian history is inclusive. From the Khajuraho temple architectures, to Konark to the Rig Veda, there is existing proofs even 2000 years ago of Indian inclusiveness of queer. It’s the draconian British law that criminalised it, which was scraped in 2009, came into effect once again following a sad judgement in 2013 and eventually was scraped off for good in 2018. I am in awe of the lawyers who fought this legal battle- colleagues and partners – Arundhati Katju

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