Au Revoir



Lupita Nyong’O said in her acceptance speech at the 86th Academy Awards, “No matter where you are from, your dreams are valid.”

Among the hundred or more dreams that I have, I want to find The Dream that is worth chasing right Now.

I want to set my priorities right.

I want to be able to have my own unbiased opinion in every field, every topic of argument, and every aspect of life.

I want to gather that much of knowledge and wisdom and experience, so that I can be confident of what I speak, and be an individual who knows her mind, who knows her decisions and is unapologetic about it.

Somewhere down the line, I’ve realized that I’m not blogging for myself anymore- I’m blogging for fame and success. So this is the right time to stop, stand and stare; do a bit of pondering.

That’s why I want to take a break from blogging. A short one. It’s my second home, my mind’s palace, so rest assured- I’ll come back to it. And when I return, I’ll blog because it makes me happy, not because I want success.

I’ll return when I can write true and honest, once again; and can view that as a success in itself.

I’ll return when those feelings, emotions and ideas that once bubbled inside me are back and when no other method of expressing or voicing it out, works.

Till then, Au Revoir…

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Queeristan by Parmesh Sahani

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  Queeristan (Amazon Link) Thanks to Audible Free Trial I listened to this amazing non-fiction on LGBTQ inclusion in Indian workplaces. Author Parmesh Sahani identifies as gay Indian, working closely with Godrej higher management and employees for years to create an inclusive workplace, both legally and in spirit. This book is a result of those years of experience, research, collaboration with individuals from difference spectrum of the society and organizations who has successfully transitioned into a queer friendly one.   Indian history is inclusive. From the Khajuraho temple architectures, to Konark to the Rig Veda, there is existing proofs even 2000 years ago of Indian inclusiveness of queer. It’s the draconian British law that criminalised it, which was scraped in 2009, came into effect once again following a sad judgement in 2013 and eventually was scraped off for good in 2018. I am in awe of the lawyers who fought this legal battle- colleagues and partners – Arundhati Katju

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Queeristan by Parmesh Sahani