A tragic End..

Come; listen to a tale of a tragic end
With no true witness
No one to pray for the departed
And no remains of the mistress.


A grey towered castle against grey slab rocks
Stood in an abandoned island,amidst the sea.
Neither fauna, nor village folks
Did dare explore the island, so strange and eerie.


But the glittering sea concealed tales untold
The castle walls bore witness to the unknown history
The solitary call for liberation; yet so bold
And the surrounding held an air of great mystery.


The remote place had a world of its own
The walls were bars for someone beautiful
With withered fate, and scathed fortune
As no mortal did respond to her desperate call.


Grown immune at last had she, to prison life
Its pains; away from the essence of the world
Had stopped every hope, strife
A hapless victim, as they called.


Yet one day the magnificent bells tolled
Announced of freedom, unrestricted mortality
But no one came, no voice called
No Rapunzel is she nor sleeping beauty.


Twenty years passed
Twenty years of solitude.
And today, our dear lady lives her last
Once the cynosure of the eyes of a multitude.


The imposing edifice was lifeless but,
With its vexing peace and tranquility
A dead soul decayed behind the doors shut
As panorama of life juxtaposed with reality.

Comments

  1. Pratikshya, you are truly amazing!
    A born poet, I'd say! :)
    This poem has found its place in my top favourites!!

    ReplyDelete

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Queeristan by Parmesh Sahani

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  Queeristan (Amazon Link) Thanks to Audible Free Trial I listened to this amazing non-fiction on LGBTQ inclusion in Indian workplaces. Author Parmesh Sahani identifies as gay Indian, working closely with Godrej higher management and employees for years to create an inclusive workplace, both legally and in spirit. This book is a result of those years of experience, research, collaboration with individuals from difference spectrum of the society and organizations who has successfully transitioned into a queer friendly one.   Indian history is inclusive. From the Khajuraho temple architectures, to Konark to the Rig Veda, there is existing proofs even 2000 years ago of Indian inclusiveness of queer. It’s the draconian British law that criminalised it, which was scraped in 2009, came into effect once again following a sad judgement in 2013 and eventually was scraped off for good in 2018. I am in awe of the lawyers who fought this legal battle- colleagues and partners – Arundhati Katju

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